Flume is one of dance music's most talented producers at the moment. The talented Aussie has spearheaded an Australian bass movement that's captivated music fans of various genres He sat down with EDM.com to discuss the movement with us.

"Ever since the Flume thing happened, all these young producers have really stepped up. Now, there's a whole bunch of us writing good music. It's kind of got a specific sound, which wasn't intended. It's kind of a little movement now," says Flume. "I never really knew about it until I started getting asked about it in interviews. I finally realized, like fuck...There's something going on. I'm stoked, and I can't wait to see where this goes."

Although Australians are known for this particular style of music, they aren't the only country producing it. Flume states, "There's the Norwegians like Cashmere Cat and Hawaiians like Mr. Carmack. It's like this bridge between dance music and hip-hop, or even pop music."

However, these producers aren't all making the same exact music. "All of us, we've got our own kind of thing," asserts Flume. "Cashmere does more experimental, pretty things. I do bigger, grander things with big strings. Mr. Carmack's shit bangs harder than anyone else. It just fuckin' slaps. Even Wave Racer [an Aussie] has got this kind of Nintendo, Mario Kart thing going."

There are a lot of up-and-coming producers in Australia, and Flume revealed a few of his favorites. He states, "Some upcoming producers are Kilter and George Maple...She's got a lot of great stuff that she hasn't put out yet, but she's going to be doing big things. Also, Willow Beats. You should listen to 'Alchemy' by them."

It's evident that this style of music is becoming huge. Cashmere Cat produced the newest Ludacris single, and he was even listed as an artist. But Flume may have one-upped that track by remixing one of the biggest pop stars in the world. Flume says, "I did an interview with a New Zealand blog, and Lorde was interviewed by them a week before. They told me they interviewed Lorde last week, and she wanted them to ask me when we're going to work together. We went back and forth on Twitter and hung out a bit. She even came over for dinner once. From there, I really wanted to remix 'Tennis Court.'"

Flume's stateside success was on display when he performed at Coachella. "Weekend 1 of Coachella was one of my favorite performances of all-time. The crowd was absolutely ramped. The crowd knew their shit, and they were super reactive," exclaims Flume. "Sometimes, I play for big crowds, and you can tell they're only there because a friend told them 'Flume's cool' or something. Everyone in the Coachella crowd was singing the lyrics and going crazy."

Flume wasn't the only one playing his music at Coachella, though. "Skrillex has kind of taken What So Not under his wing a bit, and he's pushing our sound. He actually played some of our tracks at Coachella," says Flume. "It's crazy to hear the music I made in my bedroom at my parents' house played by Skrillex on that Coachella stage with like 100,000 people watching. It's great to have such a dominant figure in the EDM world backing us."

On his own, Flume is already a star. When you pair him with Emoh Instead, the result is What So Not--one of the most talented duos in dance music. "Tell Me," What So Not's collaboration with RL Grime, was one of the most-played tracks at Coachella this year. It's mind-boggling to think about the level of success Flume is experiencing both on his own and as a duo with Emoh Instead.

Being a part of two successful acts does present one difficulty, though. "I'm finding it a lot harder to separate writing a Flume track and a What So Not track. So I just write a Harley [his real first name] track. It just comes out as my music. It's like, fuck...Is this What So Not or is it Flume? It's getting hard to differentiate between the two."

In any case, the result is likely golden. In fact, Flume appears to be a modern-day King Midas, as everything he touches turns to gold. The talented Australian producer seems to do no wrong, which makes music fans yearn for more and more music from him. Luckily, new music is on the way.

He says, "I really want to do some more remixes. I have some remixes I've worked on that I haven't released, so I'm excited to put those out. I want to write a fuckin' awesome record. Also, there's a What So Not EP before the album. I wish I could tell you when the album is coming out, but I don't know when I'll be able to finish it. I might get home and have writer's block for a year. At the start of the year, I had three months off. I just got back into it over the past few weeks, and I've been doing heaps of good shit. It took me three months of doing nothing to get there. You just forget. I toured so much that I almost forgot how to produce."

Let's collectively hope Flume never forgets how to produce. His productions have broken boundaries and spurred one of the most exciting movements in music.

Cover photo credit: Lisa Frieling

Follow Flume:


About the Author

EDM.com Staff

Join The Conversation