LED is one of Southern California's biggest dance music event promotion companies. After crossing paths and sharing moments with so many promoters involved with the company, it’s become clear to me that a promoting lifestyle can be hugely constructive. This is not only for the size of a social network but for an overall sense of well-being.

Watching interactions between members of the LED Fam (as they've titled themselves) is evidence of the positive vibes that can exist within the mainstream EDM scene. The company pulls massive talent for their large-scale events, and they are now throwing events in several major cities. They’ve even thrown multiple massive events on a single night. Through their exponential growth, their dedicated fans continue to remain in close touch with the company.

Teams of EDM fans volunteer their time to promote for LED in exchange for ticket comps. It may be easy to dismiss an opportunity to become a promoter due to the sacrifices that are involved, which is understandable. Something I've noticed, however, is that many LED promoters I know seem to be having the time of their lives at some of the most popular EDM events in the heavily saturated SoCal area. From the interactions I’ve had with LED promoters, it seems as if their connection with the scene is perfectly described in the company moniker “My Life Every Day:” a PLUR sensibility seems to be part of their innate character and not just a persona created to snag ticket buyers.

I decided to ask a few of the friendly LED Fam members to provide reasons why the promoting game is worth the occasional struggle:

1. The chance to 're-meet' old friends under a whole new set of circumstances.

LED promoter Vyelle Light says, "Recently, for LED USA [last Memorial Day weekend], I sold the majority of tickets to people I knew from high school. It was pretty shocking - they said, 'Oh, your name is VyVy? I remember you, but I didn't think it was you!' I was like, 'woah!'"

2. You can learn hands-on real world skills

Promoting is a perfect side gig to balance with work, school or a combo of the two. Los Angeles-based promoter Nathan Sabzerou attends UCLA and balances exams and schoolwork with his promoting responsibilities. He says his work with LED has helped dramatically with extra costs. Additionally, Vyella Light has experienced a thickening of her skin since becoming a promoter. She says, "With promoting, I stand my ground. People try to bail, they try to haggle, and I have to say, 'this is how it is.' I can't control it."

3. It can open doors throughout the scene - literally.

San Diego-based LED promoter Angela Cahill says, "Some people will ask me for tickets to whatever. It opens up my network so much. Some people you know or meet can get you in with no cover on some nights at some places. Before that, I would pay cover." Meet the right people, and you just might get into your favorite nightclub for free!

4. Every sale is a potential new friend.

Sabzerou says, "[I’ve met] tons of like-minded individuals, people I would otherwise have trouble finding. Selling tickets you meet a lot of new people. Every person I sell a ticket with, I create a dialogue with them. I obviously want them to be a long-time buyer but I'm also creating a new friend that likes to do the same thing that I do.” There aren’t many other jobs where you’d be able to constantly create meaningful, long-lasting friendships with your customer.

5. It can create a whole new world, no matter how distant you find yourself.

San Diego-based LED promoter Josh Nightingale says, "I had just moved out here from New York a couple of years back. I was promoting with another company before LED, and I really enjoyed getting to know the people, getting to know the scene. I was always a fan of techno in the 90s. I'm 29, so I've been around for a while, and I really wanted to get to know what was behind the scenes." In a city he was once a stranger to, "Promoting has made every friend possible."

Written by Marisa Okano

Cover photo credit: LED

Follow LED:

About the Author

EDM.com Staff

Join The Conversation