Google now receives an average of 1,500 requests to remove content that infringes copyrights per minutes. That's 2,160,000 per day.

Online piracy seems to be an ever-increasing problem, and a recent look at the sheer number of requests is just mind-boggling. Google has consistently been at the heart of controversy surrounding copyright infringement, because the site is the backbone of internet search, and links to any relevant content when searched, whether or not the content is legally posted. In the last few years Google has incorporated more measures to block copyrighted content into their search algorithm, but with the number of takedowns requests doubling since last year, obviously this hasn't done much to stem the tide of online piracy.

The question of Google's responsibility for handling piracy, or the lack thereof, has been a topic of heated debate for years. Copyright holders, such as record labels, Hollywood studio, etc. seek to hold the search engine more accountable for enabling access to stolen content. But proponents of free speech and internet freedom argue that forcing a search engine to filter content based on copyright is an unfair restriction of online freedom, and an unfair burden to put on search engines, because they are not guilty of hosting the content, but only linking to it.

Check out this article on Torrent Freak for a more in depth look

Image: http://www.radiolive.co.nz/Big-piracy-bust-in-Mt-Wellington/tabid/506/articleID/107100/Default.aspx

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Chris Cox

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