This article dives into the psychology of music and whether it can help you get laid on dating apps. There is definitely some interesting points made that music lovers may find interesting, and maybe even helpful.

Our favorite music can uplift us, inspire us, comfort us in times of pain. That power is exactly what makes our favorite songs a valuable branding accessory for the tech companies that mediate so much of our everyday lives. What better way to get almost anyone to align themselves with a corporation? What better personalization tool for a brand to get behind than the one that viscerally triggers an emotional response? In the Myspace era, music fans could slap “Hey There Delilah” next to your Top 8 to set the mood as you scrolled through their page, and today Facebook users are able to choose tunes to accompany photo slideshows. The song-sharing feature in Apple’s recently released iOS 10 lets you advertise your taste to the friends you text with, and has the added bonus of encouraging them to sign up for Apple Music. Now, America’s favorite dating app has entered the game.

In late September, Tinder and Spotify rolled out their new partnership with much fanfare, offering users the ability to add songs to your profile to help better find their soulmate. This is a change that will impact a lot of people: Spotify is by far the biggest streaming service in the world, and though Tinder does not publicly release its number of users, a New York Times article from 2014 estimated it as something like 50 million. The integration between the two services allows you to see matches based on who has similar taste in music to yours—which seems like a pretty useful feature, especially if you’re nerdy and obsessive enough to be reading a music publication—as well as display your top artists and a carefully chosen “anthem song” on your profile, to share your true musical self with the world...

... Read the fascinating article Andy Cush at SPIN

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