Last February, trance icon Paul Van Dyk suffered injuries after falling off a stage at A State of Trance 750 in Utrecht, Netherlands. After 3 months of being in the hospital and daily therapy, Paul Van Dyk is ready to perform again. Paul van Dyk opens up to What's On's Hype to discuss his fears about the injuries and the fight for his life.

He has sold over three million records, toured so much he’s effectively travelled to the moon and back (probably) and has clocked up more than 110 releases in all, and still the world clamours to see Paul van Dyk perform. So expect a busy one when he plays here in Dubai this weekend at One Big Friday, along with the likes of 99 Souls and DubVision. But earlier this year it all came to a terrifying and worrying halt.

Back in February, when performing at A State Of Trance 750 Festival in Utrecht, the Netherlands, he left the decks, clambered up on to the DJ booth, then suddenly dropped down and out of sight. He fell a considerable height and sustained serious injuries.

“I remember everything up to the fall,” the always affable Paul explains. “There was no way for me to know that the stage was not built as a solid structure. The hole I fell through was covered with black fabric and there were no markings advising to not step on the surface.”

The show was stopped and Paul was airlifted to hospital where he remained in a coma under intense observation. Eventually news came out a few days later that the German had sustained concussion and cracked vertebrae and had to remain in hospital while his condition improved. Ensuing shows were cancelled and a statement in May on Paul’s Facebook page said he was still recovering but hopeful to play some shows in June.

He did (including big ones like Electric Daisy Carnival in Las Vegas, Cream at Amnesia in Ibiza and Luminosity Festival in the Netherlands), which is all the more remarkable when you learn that the initial prognosis that was given to his mother and fiancée the day after the accident was that they should be “really happy” if his vital organs kept functioning.

“My first memory [after waking up from the coma] was a stream of warmth through my bodywhen my fiancée arrived in Utrecht at the hospital and held my hand. The first more complex memory is from about six days later when I was moved from the emergency room to an intensive care room.”

Reporting that he still has pain to this day despite on the surface being healed, Paul explains he had multiple injuries, including to the brain, and that it will take many years to arrive at a point that he has either got used to the long-term injuries or that they have healed.


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