By Kelly Frazier

Since the early 1990s, British techno DJ John Digweed started on journey that would make him one of the global dance community’s biggest influencers and respected amongst his peers for his open-minded and progressive views on the future of electronic music.

A DJ set from John Digweed is more than just a party, it’s like an art exhibition, with each track like a stroke from a paintbrush. Digweed methodically plays with a desire that hasn’t waned over the decades he’s been around spinning parties all over the globe. In Digweed’s mind, there’s always new music that needs to be shared and there is always places where that music can be played.

Recently, I was able to chat with John Digweed before his set at this year’s Movement Electronic Music Festival and we talked about the crazy events of the first time he played Movement, his history in electronic music, and how he digests music and cultivates his DJ sets.

What’s been some of your fondest moments of playing the Movement Festival?

Actually, the one that it rained was the most surreal because that was the first time I played here. I was really excited to play. I go to the stage area thinking it’s going to be covered and it’s not! Well, I thought at least the stage would be covered and the rain was just coming sideways. Maceo was on just before me and he was just drenched and I’m like “Fuck!”. I was literally going from that gig to L.A. to Australia and I’m thinking “I’m going to get the worst cold!”. It was freezing. I remember doing the gig. It was an amazing gig. I was so cold and wet, freezing to the bones. After the gig, I went and lied in the bath for about an hour just to warm my body up. I was so cold. The crowd was amazing. It was surreal. When I was DJing, as my set progressed, this space appeared so everyone was kind of in this circle in the middle of the dance floor, which I thought was really strange. It wasn’t until I looked back at some YouTube videos later on, there was almost this mini lake in the middle of the dance floor and it was about a foot and half deep. It was coming up to their knees. It just showed how much it rained on that day. How the equipment didn’t blow up and how I didn’t get electrocuted? The photographs, whoever took that photograph of me, look more something like The Deadliest Catch rather than DJing at a festival. It was just surreal...

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