If you’ve made your way to a festival at some point in your life, there’s a decent chance you’ve heard of Electric Daisy Carnival, or EDC.

Last month, over 400,000 passionate music fans made their way to Las Vegas Motor Speedway to celebrate together “under the electric sky” for three nights of festivities. Attendees danced from dusk to dawn with old and new friends to the sounds of some of the biggest electronic dance music producers including Tiesto, Kaskade, and The Chainsmokers.

What was once a small gathering twenty years ago - only 5,000 people attended the 1997 event in California - has evolved into something much more, generating a staggering $1.3 billion for the local economy according to Beacon Economics and having drawn more than 1.7 million attendees to its Las Vegas location. And that’s not all: different versions of EDC have taken place all throughout the world including New York, Mexico City, Orlando, Puerto Rico, and Tokyo. But while good music, colorful lights, and the idea of a Vegas weekend can easily draw a crowd, a key element keeps EDC and EDM (“electronic dance music”) culture thriving: the concept of PLUR.

An acronym for “Peace, Love, Unity, Respect,” the idea of PLUR is a major contributor to the massive growth of not just EDC, but festival culture in general. At EDC and other festivals all throughout the world, the PLUR lifestyle has been appealing to more people over time as these events are breaking attendance records year after year.

“Not to sound cliché, but PLUR actually does resonate with the audience heavily,” said producer and EDC performer Bro Safari...


Read the full story by Todd VanDuzer on huffingtonpost.com

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