Writer Aimee Lawrence talks with Nicole Moudaber about gender roles and gender inequality and what exactly about techno keeps her coming back for more. Moudaber recounts her journey from her first introduction to techno to her work as a promoter in Beirut to the moment she was discovered by Carl Cox in 2009.

The beats that won't stop bringing this DJ back

Once I was sat face-to-face with Nicole Moudaber – or rather fro-to-fro, in our case – she divulged to me that the activities she repeats in Ibiza during vital downtime are “roast, toast, dip, oil.” I took that as an alternative to 'Eat, Sleep, Rave, Repeat', which most of you will know as the title to one of Fatboy Slim's boisterous tracks that's served as an essential mantra to lovers of the sesh. Moudaber has lived here for 16 years and she's still game for the techno-soaked all night parties the island is famed for, but in between her gigs across the realms of Paradise, Circoloco and Carl Cox this season, she was seduced by nature's lure for a roasting toast.

Prior to us meeting up at her friend's villa, my first taste of Moudaber in the flesh was during a panel discussion on gender inequality in the dance music industry, where she spoke of being a child that had rejected dolls in favour of hammers and nails. The panel was at this year's International Music Summit, and as a dynamic, outspoken character with a commanding presence, she left me with a solid impression. Candidly stating “not a lot of men can do what I can do, so maybe not a lot of women can do it,” she’s unapologetic about where she’s stood today after grafting through the ranks. The Nigerian-born, Lebanese trailblazer can't personally relate to gender inequality within the industry because she simply has never had to battle against it compared to some of her female peers, and so it was compelling – if a little tense – to hear the dialogue unfold.

Anyway, back to the present, and before revealing one of her lifestyle mantras, she'd cut to it and asked what would be on the cards during our discussion. I'd put in a shift on YouTube to get a better feel for her character away from the booth, and with a gauge on her having a good sense of humour, I decided to break the ice with a prod at the much-discussed gender inequality matter she seems so determined to remove herself from. To put it less crudely, I offered that there'd be a strong focus on the fact she'd successfully conquered the dance music scene despite – shock horror – being a female. It did the trick, and from there I delved into what keeps Moudaber feeding hungrily from the techno tree...

... Read the full article by Aimee Lawrence at biza-spotlight.com

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