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Meet Spock: the Newest Member of Getter’s Shred Collective


So far, from Getter’s new Shred Collective label, we've heard "Inhalant Abuse" and "Uppercuts," both produced by Getter but neither being super hard bass tracks. Not that there’s anything wrong with that, but it would be hard to imagine a label run by the 'suh dude' himself to not release at least a few tracks with some gnarly bass drops.


Well, it didn’t take long.


21 year old, Fresno-born producer and close friend of Getter, Garrett Spock, has released his first single "Four Eyes" as part of the Collective. If you've ever heard any of Spock's releases on Disciple Recordings, then you're in for a bass-heavy treat. "Four Eyes" is innovative, while maintaining his style, and well crafted, so that is sets a high bar for future dubstep releases on Shred.

Originally this piece was just going to be about Spock’s newest single, but after learning that there was little known about this rising talent, we took it upon ourselves to set up an interview to find out more about the mystery man behind the bass.


EDM.com: What was the moment that you realized that music was more than just a hobby but was a career you wanted to pursue full time?


Spock: My step-dad took me to see Metallica and Lamb of God on Metallica's World Magnetic Tour when I was about 12 or 13 and it was my first concert I had ever been to. When the lights went out and "The Ecstasy of Gold" (Metallica's opening song) started to play and they walked onstage and started playing I think that was the moment I was like, "Yeah okay... This is what I want to do."


What's your first memory with music?


I think one day I just decided I wanted to play the guitar so I asked my dad if I could borrow one of his and he said yeah. So I started looking up how to read tabs and once I figured that out I learned the intro to Sweet Child O' Mine and would just play that one riff over and over every day for weeks. So my first memory with music really is just sitting alone in my room when I was about 12 or 13 and looking up guitar tabs for my favorite songs.


You recently joined Getter's Shred Collective....how did that collaboration come about?


I met Getter a few years ago when I moved to LA and we became close friends pretty quickly. He mentioned wanting to start a label or collective with his friends a while back and of course we were all super into the idea. Finally when he said he got it all in order so we can start releasing I immediately sent over a song and we got it going! It just kind of all happened organically really.

You need respect and camaraderie for any relationship. If the people you're trying to work with don't have the same respect for you that you do for them, it isn't going to work. Going out and networking is important, just know the difference between networking vs. forcing yourself into conversations and friendships.


As you've learned to develop your sound, who are some artists that have really inspired you or helped you along the way?


At first, it was Skrillex who initially got me interested in electronic music. But I met Barely Alive in a producer Facebook group when they were first starting out and they helped me a lot with production. We used to sit on Skype and they'd send me feedback and give me tips, and when Willie moved to LA he would help me finish up songs. It was actually Willie that introduced me to Getter in the first place!


What has been the hardest or most unexpected obstacle for you learning how to navigate the 'music biz'?


When I first moved to LA, I felt like I had to go out to meet and talk to as many people as I could to force my way into the industry. But looking back on it I don't think that's the right way to go about it. You need respect and camaraderie for any relationship. If the people you're trying to work with don't have the same respect for you that you do for them, it isn't going to work. Going out and networking is important, just know the difference between networking vs. forcing yourself into conversations and friendships. Things that happen organically will be much more successful and rewarding in the long run.

My goal is to make people happy and have a good time. Most of my set is high energy and heavy, but I throw in a few joke songs as well. Nothing beats watching the crowd react when they're expecting heavy bass and they get Enya or Evanescence instead.


People know you for your music, but what are some other passions or hobbies you have people might not know about?


I'm a big fan of comedy and I love making people laugh. Being able to make others happy is super rewarding. I used to make Vines (RIP) pretty often which I loved doing that, and if you follow me on twitter you'd know 99% of my tweets are jokes. I also love Minecraft and spend way too much time playing it...


What's been the proudest moment of your music career, and what's something you're working toward that you hope to accomplish?


Getting on my first flight ever for the beginning of the Wat The Frick Tour in Vermont. It was pretty crazy having hardly traveled before let alone been on an airplane, to then fly across the country and travel on a bus with my best friends playing shows all over the US. I would love to someday have my own bus tour and be able to give someone the amazing experience that I had.


I saw the Wat the Frick tour in Portland in 2016 and it was one of the best shows of my life. What's been your favorite event experience either performing or as a member of the audience?


Awesome, I'm glad you enjoyed it! I love when the crowd sings along to songs, so it was pretty amazing that every night when Getter played his song 'Head Splitter' the entire crowd knew the song and would yell, "get your head knockin" right before the drop. I put it on my snapchat every night because I thought it was so cool. That Metallica concert I mentioned earlier was an awesome experience too.

[Learn] when to say when. I used to take forever to write a song because I'd work on a tiny part that no one would ever notice for months and it just never ends. It's just wasting your creative energy.


What do you think of the EDM scene in its current state both from a music standpoint as well as the cultural side of things. What changes do you think we will start to see in regards to both in the next few years?


First off, it's great that heavy bass music is 'cool' again. From what I'm seeing, branding is more important now than it ever was. But as far as changes go, it wouldn't surprise me if in a couple years there is a giant animatronic giraffe playing a prerecorded set on an iPhone with a huge LED wall behind him who is the next big thing. ;)

What goals do you have when you perform? What emotions do you try to make the audience feel? Do you usually have an idea of what your set is going to be like or do you play off the crowd?


My goal is to make people happy and have a good time. Most of my set is high energy and heavy, but I throw in a few joke songs as well. Nothing beats watching the crowd react when they're expecting heavy bass and they get Enya or Evanescence instead. I usually have a solid idea of what I'm going to play but for instance I usually cut my 128 section shorter because I can tell they just want more 150 stuff.


What was a pivotal learning experience in your music career that you didn't see coming?


Learning when to say when. I used to take forever to write a song because I'd work on a tiny part that no one would ever notice for months and it just never ends. It's just wasting your creative energy. Learning how to finish something, calling it done, and moving on to the next thing is probably the biggest lesson a lot of people can learn.

Follow Spock:

Facebook: facebook.com/TheOfficialSpock/
Twitter: twitter.com/spockmusic
Instagram: instagram.com/spockmusic
Soundcloud:soundcloud.com/theofficialspock


For more on the Shred Collective go to shredcollective.com

Tags Getter Shred Collective Spock
Will Shuttleworth Contributing Writer

Here in Boise we might not have the biggest scene, but we can rage with the best of em. If I'm not throwing lights/raging at an event I'm probably snowboarding.

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