SPOTLIGHT TRACK

Take It Seriously (feat. Bilgo)

Avelo

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The Prophet

Please, Please, Please, No One Wants To See Your Festival Videos

Is there anything more embarrassing and cringe worthy than recording and showing friends your festival videos?

The Prophet is sorry to be so harsh, but literally no one on earth wants to see them, The Prophet can speculate that you haven't even watched them yourself.

No matter how up to date your phone, the sound quality will be atrocious, and unless you happen to be taking a video editing course at college or university, the filming quality will be hand held, hopeless and hideous.

The Prophet believes that thanks to the creation of mobile phones, festival fans have forgotten how to live in the moment, they're too busy hiding behind their mobile phone hoping to record 'that song they love'. It can't just be The Prophet who finds this whole recording on your mobile phenomenon, a little ridiculous and enormously peculiar. If you break it down you've basically spent more than $100 dollars on a ticket for the chance to record your favourite song, to then listen back to it at a later date. Instead of you know, LISTENING TO IT AT THE VERY MOMENT IT IS BEING PLAYED LIVE.

You almost certainly have the song on your iTunes or Spotify, and have certainly listened to the track the very day your were preparing to head off to the festival. Why would you then record the video and listen to a poorer quality, sound distorted version of the track you already own?

Instead of living your festival life behind a lens, get rid of the mobile phone, and embrace your five senses, if you spend your time recording, how can you possibly expect to fully enjoy the festival experience? Festivals and gigs should be more than just extended video and selfie opportunities, it's an event that shape your life.

But how will people know I had an amazing time? I hear you cry.



It wont be through posting 70 pictures on Instagram or your friends physically withering in pain as you showcase your four minute musical torture videos. It'll be through recanting them with tales and your new experiences, stories are born at festivals, friendships are made at the barriers of DJ sets, they're not made be taking 48 separate but identical photos of yourself, 'living in the moment'.

Imagine a world filled with the greatest music, intertwined with some of the most interesting individuals you'll ever interact with and instead of exploring this world, you hide behind a five inch screen, is that what festival life has become? The hollowness of sitting in an empty orchestra.

Your senses need each other, sight, smell, sound, touch and taste they all live in synchronicity with each other, if you spend your time looking at your screen you're interrupting the process of all five working together, enhancing your experience.

The Prophet might simply be out of touch with the younger generation, but looking around at a festival and witnessing hundreds, sometimes even thousands of people each staring at their phone, instantly gives the impression that they're not standing there in the moment, their hands are not aloft, their fingers aren't hypnotically moving to the beat, where are they? Somewhere else, too busy posting on social media about the great time they're having.

Everybody wants a festival ticket, if you're a fan of a certain music and you're not at the gig, then you want to be there, although it's petty to be jealous, it's simply human nature, wanting something you don't have. (Depending on the weather) it should be a pleasure to be in the middle of a festival crowd, the electricity, the tangible connection the crowd share, that's one of the few things a mobile cannot record, the atmosphere, the bind that ties a crowd together. The only way to feel it is to embrace it, is to live it, is to welcome your five senses and experience it.

Sadly it appears that The Prophet is a dying breed because recording a track is a common occurrence at gigs in this modern age, it almost seems like not wanting to film every moment or take a picture at every opportunity has resulted in The Prophet looking like a dinosaur.

There's more to life than recording every moment, it seems that by recording each moment at a gig and 100 images at a festival, you're more likely to experience it all and nothing could be further from the truth. Mobile phones have caused gig goers and festival fans to develop a fear of missing a momentous occasion by being foolish enough to use their eyes.

You should be storing musical moments by using your heart, body, and soul.

To paraphrase Tyler Durden of the iconic book and movie Fight Club, “The technology we control, ends up controlling us.”

If you refuse to take heed from The Prophet's words, then ponder this, remember when your parents brought their friends round to show off two weeks of holiday photos, and you cringed so hard 'you wanted to die'?

Your generation has simply found a way of modernising the embarrassing 'holiday photo montage', and to top it off you've added a soundtrack.

Until next time 'The Prophet' has spoken

Cover photo courtesy of REUTERS/Dylan Martinez

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The Prophet Truthspeaker and Soothsayer

Visions of dance music from the mind of The Prophet.

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