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Doctors from the University of Cincinnati are researching innovative ways to battle brain fog, and a new study has tested the waters of virtual music therapy.

According to a report by WFMZ-TV, neuro-oncologist Dr. Soma Sengupta and her team have developed an app called ARMcan Active Receptive Music, which harnesses music therapy to allow users to create their own songs.

"I wanted an app that could allow patients to express their musical ability," Sengupta said. "In other words, to have musical turns where you could overlay genres and create your own music track."

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The technology, Sengupta added, is "helping the rewiring and exercising areas of the brain that normally wouldn't do it."

The team's research further emphasizes just how useful music can be outside of the realm of entertainment. According to the University of Cincinnati, Sengupta's research is applicable beyond cancer patients who have received chemotherapy and are now experiencing brain fog, as those suffering from the condition due to COVID-19 may benefit from similar stimulation.

The app is reportedly being implemented in a randomized study conducted by Sengupta and her colleagues, wherein breast cancer survivors who are experiencing brain fog are assigned to one of two groups: those who listen to music 15 minutes a day and those who write their own music for 15 minutes a day. They are additionally receiving MRI scans at six, 12, and 18 months to track progress and measure how effective this new form of music therapy can be. 

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