Skip to main content

Instead of sweet music, musicians are hearing a death knell in the wake of the pandemic.

According to a study by Help Musicians, one-fifth of musicians have considered a career change because they're unable to make ends meet financially through music, among other factors. Other artists have done quite well on platforms like Spotify. 

Help Musicians interviewed nearly 1,000 musicians to gather insight and data on how the pandemic continues to affect working musicians. One-third of the surveyed musicians noted that they were still earning nothing after the pandemic. Nine in 10 musicians are earning less than £1,000 (about $1,338) per month.

Recommended Articles

Drought

Three Musicians Took 100 Years of Climate Change Data and Turned Them Into Songs

More than 100 years of climate change data across numerous states was compiled and turned into songs.

[Press pic] Kaskade 2

Kaskade Is Releasing a Reimagined Version of His Iconic "Fire and Ice" Album

This new version is "not to be compared to the original," Kaskade said.

Shallou

Shallou Shines Bright On "The Long Way Home" EP, Launches Remix Contest On Discord

"The EP bears a hopeful theme of getting through the worst times."

"Whilst much of the economy is gradually getting back to normal, it will be a long time before musicians expect to earn their pre-pandemic income levels, as we predicted from the start of the pandemic," said James Ainscough, chief executive at Help Musicians in a statement. "For the past 18 months, we have been supporting nearly 20,000 musicians with direct financial aid to help them pay their bills and stay afloat."

It seems there has not been any improvement on these statistics since the pandemic began. In fact, the numbers fall in line with a survey conducted by Encore Musicians in 2020. 

Help Musicians continues to provide financial support to musicians who struggle during the pandemic, but they also cite mental health as one of the issues preventing them from working. 

"As the industry starts to recover we are shifting our emphasis towards helping musicians rebuild with a wide package of support from advice on diversifying income streams, mentoring to rebuild connections, mental health support and much more," Ainscough added.

Related

Music Minds Matter Hotline

Help Musicians UK is Leading the Discussion on Mental Health in Music

A UK based charity is making dedicated mental health support for music industry professionals just a phone call away.

Adele

Musicians are Three Times More Likely to be Depressed, Study Finds

MusicTank and the University of Westminister found that 68.5% of respondents stated they experienced depression.

Ultra Music Festival 2019 - Carl Cox RESISTANCE Megastructure

Three in Four Black Music Professionals Have Experienced Racism, Study Finds

The wide-reaching research quantifies inequality on both the creative and business sides of the music industry in the U.K.

clubhouse

Clubhouse and the Music Industry: Tips and Tricks for Utilizing the App to Elevate Your Career

Clubhouse provides many opportunities for artists to take advantage of their platform.

Drought

Three Musicians Took 100 Years of Climate Change Data and Turned Them Into Songs

More than 100 years of climate change data across numerous states was compiled and turned into songs.

Microphones

What is Music Licensing and Why is it Important for my Career as an Artist?

Music licensing can be a very fruitful revenue stream for musicians. Here's what you need to know.

Screen Shot 2020-10-17 at 7.18.21 AM

Disabled Musicians Face "Significant Barriers" to Music Education, New Study Shows

The "Reshape Music" study recommends more representation of disabled people in the music industry, including in venues and educational organizations.